Card Games

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  • Number of Players: 3 Players
  • Number of Players: 4 Players
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    Star Realms Box Set

    €39.95

    Forge your own star realm! Build up your military through shipping and trade, then use your mighty fleet of warships to protect what’s yours and take what isn’t!

    Designed by Magic hall-of-famers Darwin Kastle and Rob Dougherty, Star Realms combines the fun of deckbuilding games with the interactivity of trading card game-style combat. As you play, use trade to add new ships and bases to your deck. When played, those ships and bases generate powerful effects, additional trade, and combat to attack your opponent and their bases. If you reduce your opponent’s score to zero, you win!

    This Star Realms Box Set includes all of the cards from the Star Realms Core Set and Gambit Set, plus a game board and two additional starting decks, providing awesome gameplay for 2-4 players. And the Nemesis Beast and the Pirates of the Dark Star challenge cards provide additional solo and cooperative play options! Each box is a complete 4-player game containing rules and 162 cards.

    Contents:
    • Folding game board
    • Four pairs of score cards
    • Four 10-card starting decks
    • 16 Explorer cards
    • 83-card main deck
    • 13 Gambit cards
    • 2 Oversized Challenge Cards
    • Rulebook

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    Abyss: Leviathan

    €31.95

    News from the outpost is worrying. The Leviathans, these terrifying sea monsters, are converging towards the border and threatening the Kingdom. Will the Allies and the conscripts, mandated by each of the Guilds, contain them? Exploring is now dangerous: fighting is not easy, and fleeing can be even more dangerous — but the opportunity is unique to prove your worth and use this influence to gain access to the throne.

    In Abyss: Leviathan, the threat track is replaced by the border board on which Leviathan cards will be placed. When you explore the depths, if the revealed card is a monster, you can fight a Leviathan on the border. Some new lords and some allies will help you fight, using their power. The player who has killed the greatest number of sea monsters takes the statue and wins 5 extra points at the end of the game — and if you do not fight, you may get injured...

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    Arkwright The Card Game

    €27.95

    In the late 18th century, the Industrial Revolution starts. The first factories were founded by businessmen like Richard Arkwright, who ran the first factory for spinning wool with machines like the "Spinning Jenny" and the water frame.

    In "Arkwright: The Card Game", you run a business and will employ workers in your different factories to produce and sell goods. The more workers, the more goods that can be sold — but be prepared for crises and some stiff competition.

    The game is played over three decades (1770/1780/1790), split up into four rounds per decade. On your turn, you play new cards from your hand to open factories and upgrade existing ones, select improvements, improve factory quality, build machines, and employ new workers. You can also pay money to improve your shareholdings, and take out loans if you require more money for production costs. After the actions phase, you can improve your abilities by advancing your development markers on your player board, or take one of the available development cards.

    Then, the production phase starts, where every player who owns a factory of the current good produces those goods. The market fluctuates with the general demand, so the demand may be lower than the value of your current good, lowering your profit. Workers must be paid, and machines need regular maintenance, so you can possibly lose money instead of turning a profit. Selling enough of one good improves your share value, and there are bonuses for having the highest appeal. Lastly, if you can’t sell your goods to the home market, you can ship them overseas or store them for future rounds.

    After the final round of the last decade, the game ends. Players then sell all goods left in their storehouses, reduce the number of shares they hold by the number of loans they took, and reduce their share value based on their personal shipping track. Each player then multiplies the number of their shares by their share value to determine their end score. The player with the highest end score wins the game.